GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster

@article{Maselli2014GRB1A,
  title={GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster},
  author={Alessandro Maselli and A. Melandri and Lara Nava and C. G. Mundell and Nobuyuki Kawai and Simone Campana and Stefano Covino and Jay R. Cummings and G Cusumano and P. A. Evans and Giancarlo Ghirlanda and Gabriele Ghisellini and C. Guidorzi and S. Kobayashi and P Kuin and Valentina La Parola and Vanessa Mangano and S. R. Oates and Takanori Sakamoto and Motoko Serino and Francisco J. Virgili and B.-B. Zhang and Scott Douglas Barthelmy and A P Beardmore and Maria Grazia Bernardini and David Bersier and David N. Burrows and Giorgio Calderone and M. Capalbi and Jung-hsien Chiang and Paolo D’Avanzo and V. D’Elia and Massimiliano De Pasquale and Dino Fugazza and Neil Gehrels and A Gomboc and Richard Harrison and Hidekazu Hanayama and J. Japelj and Jamie A. Kennea and Drejc Kopa{\vc} and Chryssa Kouveliotou and Daisuke Kuroda and Andrew J. Levan and Daniele B. Malesani and F. E. Marshall and J A Nousek and P. T. O’Brien and J. P. Osborne and Claudio Pagani and Kim L Page and M. T. Page and Matteo Perri and Tyler Pritchard and Patrizia Romano and Y. Saito and B. Sbarufatti and Ruben Salvaterra and Iain A. Steele and Nial R. Tanvir and G. Vianello and B. Wiegand and Klaas Wiersema and Yoichi Yatsu and Taketoshi Yoshii and Gianpiero Tagliaferri},
  journal={Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={343},
  pages={48 - 51}
}
Bright Lights Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), bright flashes of gamma-ray light, are thought to be associated with the collapse of massive stars. GRB 130427A was detected on 27 April 2013, and it had the longest gamma-ray duration and one of the largest isotropic energy releases observed to date (see the Perspective by Fynbo). Ackermann et al. (p. 42, published online 21 November) report data obtained with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, which reveal a high-energy spectral component that cannot… 
Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A
TLDR
Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.
The Bright Optical Flash and Afterglow from the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A
TLDR
The link between optical afterglow and >100-MeV emission suggests that nearby early peaked afterglows will be the best candidates for studying gamma-ray emission at energies ranging from gigaelectron volts to teraelectrons volts.
The First Pulse of the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A: A Test Lab for Synchrotron Shocks
TLDR
Multiwavelength data from an extremely bright stellar explosion provide details of the physics of these violent events, and suggests that existing models cannot explain all the observed spectral and temporal behaviors simultaneously.
Modeling the Early Multiwavelength Emission in GRB 130427a
One of the most powerful gamma-ray bursts, GRB 130427A was swiftly detected from GeV $\gamma$-rays to optical wavelengths. In the GeV band, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray
Constraints on Very High Energy Emission from GRB 130427A
Prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z=0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors.
An Exceptionally Bright Gamma-Ray Burst
TLDR
A suite of satellites and ground-based observatories studied the emission from this burst at wavelengths ranging from radio waves over visible light to very high-energy γ-rays, providing an unprecedented opportunity to test and improve models of this spectacular class of cosmic explosions.
GRB 120711A: an intense INTEGRAL burst with long-lasting soft γ-ray emission and a powerful optical flash
A long and intense γ-ray burst (GRB) was detected by INTEGRAL on 11 July 2012 with a duration of ∼115 s and fluence of 2.8 × 10 −4 erg cm −2 in the 20 keV−8 MeV energy range. GRB 120711A was at z ∼
Search for Gamma-Rays from the Unusually Bright GRB 130427A with the HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory
The first limits on the prompt emission from the long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A in the >100 GeV energy band are reported. GRB 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift z
A magnetar powering the ordinary monster GRB 130427A
We present the analysis of the extraordinarily bright Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 130427A under the hypothesis that the GRB central engine is an accretion–powered magnetar. In this framework, initially
Probing the bright radio flare and afterglow of GRB 130427A with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager
ABSTRACT We present one of the best sampled early time light curves of a gamma-ray burst (GRB)at radio wavelengths. Using the Arcminute Mircrokelvin Imager (AMI) we observed GRB130427A at the central
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References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 85 REFERENCES
Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A
TLDR
Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.
The Bright Optical Flash and Afterglow from the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A
TLDR
The link between optical afterglow and >100-MeV emission suggests that nearby early peaked afterglows will be the best candidates for studying gamma-ray emission at energies ranging from gigaelectron volts to teraelectrons volts.
The First Pulse of the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A: A Test Lab for Synchrotron Shocks
TLDR
Multiwavelength data from an extremely bright stellar explosion provide details of the physics of these violent events, and suggests that existing models cannot explain all the observed spectral and temporal behaviors simultaneously.
A Reverse Shock in GRB 130427A
We present extensive radio and millimeter observations of the unusually bright GRB 130427A at z = 0.340, spanning 0.67-12 days after the burst. We combine these data with detailed multi-band UV,
The prompt-afterglow connection in gamma-ray bursts: a comprehensive statistical analysis of Swift X-ray light curves
We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of Swift X-ray light-curves of GammaRay Bursts (GRBs) collecting data from more than 650 GRBs discovered by Swift and other facilities. The
DISCOVERY OF AN EXTRA HARD SPECTRAL COMPONENT IN THE HIGH-ENERGY AFTERGLOW EMISSION OF GRB 130427A
The extended high-energy gamma-ray (> 100 MeV) emission which occurs after prompt gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually characterized by a single power-law spectrum, which has been explained as the
Hydrodynamics of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow
The detection of delayed emission at X-ray optical and radio wavelengths (afterglow) following gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) suggests that the relativistic shell that emitted the initial GRB as the result
THE AFTERGLOW OF GRB 130427A FROM 1 TO 10(16) GHz
We present multiwavelength observations of the afterglow of GRB 130427A, the brightest (in total fluence) gamma-ray burst (GRB) of the past 29 yr. Optical spectroscopy from Gemini-North reveals the
A unifying view of gamma-ray burst afterglows
We selected a sample of 33 Gamma‐Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by Swift, with known redshift and optical extinction at the host frame. For these, we constructed the de‐absorbed and K‐corrected X‐ray and
Panchromatic study of GRB 060124: From precursor to afterglow
We present observations of GRB 060124, the first event for which both the prompt and the afterglow emission could be observed simultaneously and in their entirety by the three Swift instruments.
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