GOING NATIVE: ŠAMAŠ-ŠUMA-UKĪN, ASSYRIAN KING OF BABYLON

@article{Zaia2019GOINGN,
  title={GOING NATIVE: {\vS}AMA{\vS}-{\vS}UMA-UKĪN, ASSYRIAN KING OF BABYLON},
  author={Shana Zaia},
  journal={Iraq},
  year={2019},
  volume={81},
  pages={247 - 268}
}
Šamaš-šuma-ukīn is a unique case in the Neo-Assyrian Empire: he was a member of the Assyrian royal family who was installed as king of Babylonia but never of Assyria. Previous Assyrian rulers who had control over Babylonia were recognized as kings of both polities, but Šamaš-šuma-ukīn's father, Esarhaddon, had decided to split the empire between two of his sons, giving Ashurbanipal kingship over Assyria and Šamaš-šuma-ukīn the throne of Babylonia. As a result, Šamaš-šuma-ukīn is an intriguing… 
THE ROVING OTHER: SHEPHERDS, TEMPLES, AND EMPIRES IN FIRST-MILLENNIUM MESOPOTAMIA
Much of the literature on pastoralists and empire concerns mobile tribes and often focuses on imperial schemes of resettlement, or tribal thwarting of state initiatives. This submission argues that

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