• Corpus ID: 195808899

GO WITH THE FLOW : STATIONARY WOODEN FISHING STRUCTURES AND THE SIGNIFICANCE OF ESTUARY FISHING IN SUBNEOLITHIC FINLAND

@inproceedings{Koivisto2016GOWT,
  title={GO WITH THE FLOW : STATIONARY WOODEN FISHING STRUCTURES AND THE SIGNIFICANCE OF ESTUARY FISHING IN SUBNEOLITHIC FINLAND},
  author={Satu Koivisto and Katariina Nurminen},
  year={2016}
}
We still lack basic knowledge of the intensity and character of fishing as subsistence among the Stone Age populations of the northeast shores of the Baltic Sea. In locations where direct evidence of fish utilisation is insufficient, various forms of indirect evidence play an essential role. Generalisations about the importance of fishing are mainly based on shore-bound site locations, fragmentary burnt fish remains, and fishing-related artefacts recovered at archaeological sites. The remains… 

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