GENES, DIVERSITY, AND GEOLOGIC PROCESS ON THE PACIFIC COAST

@article{Jacobs2004GENESDA,
  title={GENES, DIVERSITY, AND GEOLOGIC PROCESS ON THE PACIFIC COAST},
  author={David K Jacobs and Todd A. Haney and Kristina D. Louie},
  journal={Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={32},
  pages={601-652}
}
▪ Abstract We examine the genetics of marine diversification along the West Coast of North America in relation to the Late Neogene geology and climate of the region. Trophically important components of the diverse West Coast fauna, including kelp, alcid birds (e.g., auks, puffins), salmon, rockfish, abalone, and Cancer crabs, appear to have radiated during peaks of upwelling primarily in the Late Miocene and in some cases secondarily in the Pleistocene. Phylogeographic barriers associated with… 

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