GENERALIZED MILANKOVITCH CYCLES AND LONG-TERM CLIMATIC HABITABILITY

@article{Spiegel2010GENERALIZEDMC,
  title={GENERALIZED MILANKOVITCH CYCLES AND LONG-TERM CLIMATIC HABITABILITY},
  author={David S. Spiegel and Sean N. Raymond and Courtney D. Dressing and Caleb A. Scharf and Jonathan L. Mitchell},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2010},
  volume={721},
  pages={1308 - 1318}
}
Although Earth's orbit is never far from circular, terrestrial planets around other stars might experience substantial changes in eccentricity. Eccentricity variations could lead to climate changes, including possible “phase transitions” such as the snowball transition (or its opposite). There is evidence that Earth has gone through at least one globally frozen, “snowball” state in the last billion years, which it is thought to have exited after several million years because global ice-cover… 

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