GENE FLOW IN CHAMAECRISTA FASCICULATA (LEGUMINOSAE) II. GENE ESTABLISHMENT

@article{Fenster1991GENEFI,
  title={GENE FLOW IN CHAMAECRISTA FASCICULATA (LEGUMINOSAE) II. GENE ESTABLISHMENT},
  author={Charles B. Fenster},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1991},
  volume={45}
}
The role of gene establishment in gene flow was investigated in a population of the annual legume Chamaecrista fasciculata by determining the effect of interparent distance on progeny fitness throughout the entire life history. A decelerating gain in progeny fitness with increasing interparent distance was observed. Selfed progeny suffered a 2‐fold fitness disadvantage compared to progeny derived from mating events between individuals in the same neighborhood. Progeny derived from within… 

GENE FLOW IN CHAMAECRISTA FASCICULATA (LEGUMINOSAE) I. GENE DISPERSAL

  • C. Fenster
  • Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1991
Both pollen and seed dispersal components of gene flow were examined in the annual plant Chamaecrista fasciculata (Leguminosae) and quantified in terms of Wright's neighborhood area to determine whether pollinations should be weighted differentially across the flowering season.

QUANTIFYING GENE FLOW FROM SPATIAL GENETIC STRUCTURE DATA IN A METAPOPULATION OF CHAMAECRISTA FASCICULATA (LEGUMINOSAE)

An extensive allozyme survey was conducted within a natural “meta” population of the native North American annual legume to quantify genetic structure at different spatial scales, finding that little biparental inbreeding was observed and most departure from Hardy-Weinberg genotypic proportions was explained by self-fertilization.

Nonlocal transplantation and outbreeding depression in the subshrub Lotus scoparius (Fabaceae).

The genetic background of transplants used to create or augment wild populations may affect the long-term success of restored populations. If seed sources are from differently adapted populations,

Factors influencing the genetic structure of Phacelia dubia, a species with a seed bank and large fluctuations in population size

It was concluded that the mating system is the leading factor determining the genetic structure and that the seed bank ensures genetic constancy in time in the face of large fluctuations in population size.

Kinship between parents reduces offspring fitness in a natural population of Rhododendron brachycarpum.

The level of inbreeding between individuals determines offspring fitness in R. brachycarpum, especially during seed maturation, and genetic relatedness between parents caused inbreeding depression in their progeny.

Inbreeding and Outbreeding Depression in Natural Populations of Chamaecrista fasciculata (Fabaceae)

It appears that crossing populations of up to intermediate distances of hundreds of kilometers has a short-term beneficial effect on progeny performance through F1, and that longer-term effects are not necessarily disruptive of fitness, at least relative to parental performance.

Euglossine bees mediate only limited long-distance gene flow in a tropical vine.

It is suggested that, although female euglossine bees might be effective at moving pollen within populations, and perhaps within forest blocks, their contribution to gene flow on the regional scale seems too limited to counteract genetic drift in patchily distributed tropical plants.

The reproductive consequences of reduced population size in the biennial Sabatia angularis (Gentianaceae)

Reduced pollen load in the smallest population suggests that reduced fruit set in the largest populations may be due to pollen limitation, and a similar quadratic pattern was seen between reproductive success and population size across all but the very largest population.

UNDERSTANDING THE POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE OF GLEDITSIA TRIACANTHOS L.: THE SCALE AND PATTERN OF POLLEN GENE FLOW

Within populations, a multiple regression model showed that maximum‐likelihood estimates of male fertility were negatively associated with distances between mates and positively associated with male size as measured by stem diameter, but in neither population, did the regression explain more than 16% of the total variation in male fertilities.

Demographic consequences of inbreeding and outbreeding in Arnica montana: a field experiment

The observed higher survival of seedlings as compared with seeds suggests that it is better to plant individuals than to sow, and significant differences among populations for all measured fitness components suggest that reinforcement is best achieved using material from several populations.
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References

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GENE FLOW IN CHAMAECRISTA FASCICULATA (LEGUMINOSAE) I. GENE DISPERSAL

  • C. Fenster
  • Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1991
Both pollen and seed dispersal components of gene flow were examined in the annual plant Chamaecrista fasciculata (Leguminosae) and quantified in terms of Wright's neighborhood area to determine whether pollinations should be weighted differentially across the flowering season.

Measurement of gene flow in Lupinus texensis

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  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Nature
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The measurement of the pollen component of gene flow in the insect-pollinated species, Lupinus texensis is reported, to compare the actual gene flow distribution with the distribution inferred from pollinator flight movements, and to determine the genetic neighbourhood size of this species from the pollen and seed dispersal distributions.

Pollen dispersal and optimal outcrossing in Delphinium nelsoni

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Optimal outcrossing in Ipomopsis aggregata : Seed set and offspring fitness

The possibility that differences in seed set might in part reflect maternal mate discrimination is discussed and the desirability of measuring offspring fitness under natural conditions in assessing outcrossing effects is emphasized.

BREEDING SYSTEM AND HABITAT EFFECTS ON FITNESS COMPONENTS IN THREE NEOTROPICAL COSTUS (ZINGIBERACEAE)

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    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
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Although this question is of general theoretical interest, the diverse reproductive systems and relative ease of experimental manipulation in plants renders them particularly suitable for a quantitative study of breeding-system evolution.

POPULATION STRUCTURE AND LOCAL SELECTION IN IMPATIENS PALLIDA (BALSAMINACEAE), A SELFING ANNUAL

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    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
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In this paper, the extent of differentiation and local adaptation in Impatiens pallida (Balsaminaceae), a selfing annual is quantified and the role of selection in population differentiation is experimentally determined.

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Seven populations of Limnanthes alba were described for their rates of outbreeding, amount of genetic variability, and response to enforced selfing in terms of inbreeding depression, with the main conclusion that inbreeder and outbreeder species have similar genetic structures.

Effect of crossing distance and male parent on in vivo pollen tube growth in Chamaecrista fasciculata

The results suggest a lack of gametophytic competition and indicate little opportunity for sexual selection on pollen tube growth in C. fasciculata, and suggest the genetic relatedness among parents may influence pollen performance.

CROSS ABILITY OF MIMULUS GUTTATUS IN RELATION TO COMPONENTS OF GENE FIXATION

A model is proposed wherein parental gene fixation influences distance‐dependent crossing success and inbreeding is favored if natural selection caused allele fixation, or is disfavored if gene fixation was random.

INBREEDING DEPRESSION AND PROXIMITY‐DEPENDENT CROSSING SUCCESS IN PHLOX DRUMMONDII

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  • Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1984
The magnitude of viability depression from inbreeding in plants is dependent upon genetic and environmental variables, and species whose genetic systems are adapted to relatively high levels of homozygosity are likely to show the least viability depression with inbreeding.
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