GAPS in the verb lexicons of children with specific language impairment

@article{Rice1993GAPSIT,
  title={GAPS in the verb lexicons of children with specific language impairment},
  author={Mabel L. Rice and John V. Bode},
  journal={First Language},
  year={1993},
  volume={13},
  pages={113 - 131}
}
This is a study of the verb lexicons of three preschool boys with specific language impairment. The database was a corpus of 5486 spontaneous utterances collected over a 3-month period. The children relied heavily on a small set of General All-Purpose (GAP) verbs to fill the verb functions. Their overall verb error rate was very low (2% of their utterances). In general, their verb usage conformed to expected rules of form class assignment and argument structure. Their occasional substitution… 

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