GAPS AND ROOT TRENCHING INCREASE TREE SEEDLING GROWTH IN PANAMANIAN SEMI‐EVERGREEN FOREST

@article{Barberis2005GAPSAR,
  title={GAPS AND ROOT TRENCHING INCREASE TREE SEEDLING GROWTH IN PANAMANIAN SEMI‐EVERGREEN FOREST},
  author={Ignacio Mart{\'i}n Barberis and Edmund V. J. Tanner},
  journal={Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={86},
  pages={667-674}
}
Although competition between plants is nearly universal in vegetation, we know relatively little about belowground competition and how it interacts with aboveground competition in tropical forests, and almost nothing about such interactions on soils of intermediate fertility in sites with a moderate dry season, despite the fact that such forests are extensive. We investigated this over one year in a Panamanian tropical semi-evergreen rain forest, using tree seedlings (Simarouba amara, Gustavia… 

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