GABA: an excitatory transmitter in early postnatal life

@article{Cherubini1991GABAAE,
  title={GABA: an excitatory transmitter in early postnatal life},
  author={Enrico Cherubini and Jean-Luc Gaiarsa and Yehezkel Ben-Ari},
  journal={Trends in Neurosciences},
  year={1991},
  volume={14},
  pages={515-519}
}

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