Future changes of El Niño in two global coupled climate models

@article{Meehl2006FutureCO,
  title={Future changes of El Ni{\~n}o in two global coupled climate models},
  author={Gerald A. Meehl and Haiyan Teng and Grant Branstator},
  journal={Climate Dynamics},
  year={2006},
  volume={26},
  pages={549-566}
}
Idealized forcing experiments with 1% per year CO2 increase to stabilized doubled and quadrupled CO2, twenty-first century transient scenario experiments (SRES scenarios A1B and B1), and stabilized twenty-second century A1B and B1 experiments with two global coupled climate models (PCM and CCSM3) are analyzed for possible future changes of El Niño events. With increased CO2 in the models, there is a reduction of amplitude of El Niño events. This is particularly apparent with larger forcing in… 
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