Future Directions for Intrathecal Pain Management: A Review and Update From the Interdisciplinary Polyanalgesic Consensus Conference 2007

@article{Deer2008FutureDF,
  title={Future Directions for Intrathecal Pain Management: A Review and Update From the Interdisciplinary Polyanalgesic Consensus Conference 2007},
  author={T. Deer and E. Krames and S. Hassenbusch and A. Burton and D. Caraway and S. Dupen and J. Eisenach and Michael Erdek and E. Grigsby and Phillip Kim and R. Levy and G. Mcdowell and N. Mekhail and S. Panchal and J. Prager and R. Rauck and M. Saulino and Todd B. Sitzman and P. Staats and M. Stanton-Hicks and L. Stearns and K. Dean Willis and W. Witt and K. Follett and M. Huntoon and Leong Liem and J. Rathmell and M. Wallace and E. Buchser and M. Cousins and Ann Ver Donck},
  journal={Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface},
  year={2008},
  volume={11}
}
Background.  Expert panels of physicians and nonphysicians, all expert in intrathecal (IT) therapies, convened in the years 2000 and 2003 to make recommendations for the rational use of IT analgesics, based on the preclinical and clinical literature known up to those times, presentations of the expert panels, discussions on current practice and standards, and the result of surveys of physicians using IT agents. An expert panel of physicians and nonphysicians has convened in 2007 to update… Expand
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An expert panel of physicians and nonphysicians convened in 2007 to review previous recommendations and to form recommendations for the rational use of IT agents as they pertain to new scientific and clinical information regarding the etiology, prevention and treatment for IT granuloma. Expand
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