Further support for the alignment of cattle along magnetic field lines: reply to Hert et al.

@article{Begall2011FurtherSF,
  title={Further support for the alignment of cattle along magnetic field lines: reply to Hert et al.},
  author={S. Begall and H. Burda and J. {\vC}erven{\'y} and O. Gerter and J. Neef-Weisse and P. Němec},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology},
  year={2011},
  volume={197},
  pages={1127 - 1133}
}
  • S. Begall, H. Burda, +3 authors P. Němec
  • Published 2011
  • Geology, Medicine
  • Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
Hert et al. (J Comp Physiol A, 2011) challenged one part of the study by Begall et al. (PNAS 105:13451–13455, 2008) claiming that they could not replicate the finding of preferential magnetic alignment of cattle recorded in aerial images of Google Earth. However, Hert and co-authors used a different statistical approach and applied the statistics on a sample partly unsuitable to examine magnetic alignment. About 50% of their data represent noise (resolution of the images is too poor to enable… Expand

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