Further evidence for small-bodied hominins from the Late Pleistocene of Flores, Indonesia

@article{Morwood2005FurtherEF,
  title={Further evidence for small-bodied hominins from the Late Pleistocene of Flores, Indonesia},
  author={Michael J. Morwood and P. Brown and Jatmiko and Thomas Sutikna and E. Wahyu Saptomo and Kira E. Westaway and Rokus Awe Due and Richard G. Roberts and Tomoko Maeda and Sri Wasisto and Tony Djubiantono},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={437},
  pages={1012-1017}
}
Homo floresiensis was recovered from Late Pleistocene deposits on the island of Flores in eastern Indonesia, but has the stature, limb proportions and endocranial volume of African Pliocene Australopithecus. The holotype of the species (LB1), excavated in 2003 from Liang Bua, consisted of a partial skeleton minus the arms. Here we describe additional H. floresiensis remains excavated from the cave in 2004. These include arm bones belonging to the holotype skeleton, a second adult mandible, and… 

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    Journal of human evolution
  • 2012
The Liang Bua faunal remains: a 95k.yr. sequence from Flores, East Indonesia.
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