Further considerations on the cult of Kybele

@article{Vassileva2001FurtherCO,
  title={Further considerations on the cult of Kybele},
  author={Maya Vassileva},
  journal={Anatolian Studies},
  year={2001},
  volume={51},
  pages={51 - 64}
}
Modern scholarship has produced a large volume of literature on the Phrygian goddess Kybele. The image of the Great Mother-Goddess, both on European and on Anatolian soil, has long attracted scholarly attention. Besides works that have become classics (Graillot 1912; Vermaseren 1977), I will list just a few more recent studies (Naumann 1983; Borgeaud 1996; Işık 1999; Roller 1999). The representations of Kybele are gathered in the eight volume Corpus by M J Vermaseren (most valuable for the… 

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