Further Course of Mental Health and Use of Alcohol and Tranquilizers After Cessation or Persistence of Cannabis Use in Young Adulthood: A Longitudinal Study

@article{Hammer1992FurtherCO,
  title={Further Course of Mental Health and Use of Alcohol and Tranquilizers After Cessation or Persistence of Cannabis Use in Young Adulthood: A Longitudinal Study},
  author={T. Hammer and P. Vaglum},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  year={1992},
  volume={20},
  pages={143 - 150}
}
The main question addressed in this study is how cessation or persistence of cannabis use is related to use of legal drugs and mental health problems. In a longitudinal study a representative sample of young people in Norway, age 17–20 years (n = 1997), participated in a postal survey in 1985 and was followed up again in 1987 and 1989. The results showed a decrease in alcohol consumption among men both among those who ceased to use cannabis and those who continued their use, whereas among women… Expand
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