Fur seals and sea lions (Otariidae): Identification of species and taxonomic review

@article{Brunner2004FurSA,
  title={Fur seals and sea lions (Otariidae): Identification of species and taxonomic review},
  author={Sylvia Brunner},
  journal={Systematics and Biodiversity},
  year={2004},
  volume={1},
  pages={339 - 439}
}
  • S. Brunner
  • Published 1 February 2004
  • Biology
  • Systematics and Biodiversity
Abstract The standard anatomical descriptions given to identify species of the family Otariidae (fur seals and sea lions), particularly those for the genus Arctocephalus, have been largely inconclusive. Specimens of some species conformed more to the description of others, overlapping in many identifying characteristics. Recent re‐examination of the genetic basis of taxonomic diversity within otariids required matching by comprehensive new studies of skull morphometry based on large sample… 
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Phylogenomic Discordance in the Eared Seals is best explained by Incomplete Lineage Sorting following Explosive Radiation in the Southern Hemisphere
TLDR
High-coverage genome-wide sequencing is used for 14 of the 15 species of Otariidae to elucidate the phylogeny of the family and its bearing on the taxonomy and biogeographical history and finds a fully supported species tree that agrees with the few well-accepted relationships and establishes monophyly of the genus Arctocephalus.
Phylogenomic Discordance in the Eared Seals is best explained by Incomplete Lineage Sorting following Explosive Radiation in the Southern Hemisphere.
TLDR
High-coverage genome-wide sequencing is used for 14 of the 15 species of Otariidae to elucidate the phylogeny of the family and its bearing on the taxonomy and biogeographical history and finds a fully supported species tree that agrees with the few well-accepted relationships and establishes monophyly of the genus Arctocephalus.
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