Fur Seals Display a Strong Drive for Bilateral Slow-Wave Sleep While on Land

@article{Lyamin2008FurSD,
  title={Fur Seals Display a Strong Drive for Bilateral Slow-Wave Sleep While on Land},
  author={O. Lyamin and P. Kosenko and J. Lapierre and L. Mukhametov and J. Siegel},
  journal={The Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2008},
  volume={28},
  pages={12614 - 12621}
}
Fur seals (pinnipeds of the family Otariidae) display two fundamentally different patterns of sleep: bilaterally symmetrical slow-wave sleep (BSWS) as seen in terrestrial mammals and slow-wave sleep (SWS) with a striking interhemispheric EEG asymmetry (asymmetrical SWS or ASWS) as observed in cetaceans. We examined the effect of preventing fur seals from sleeping in BSWS on their pattern of sleep. Four northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) kept on land were sleep deprived (SD) of BSWS for 3… Expand
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