Funnel‐web spider bite: a systematic review of recorded clinical cases

@article{Isbister2005FunnelwebSB,
  title={Funnel‐web spider bite: a systematic review of recorded clinical cases},
  author={G. Isbister and M. Gray and C. Balit and R. Raven and B. Stokes and K. Porges and A. Tankel and Elizabeth Turner and Julian White and M. Fisher},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={2005},
  volume={182}
}
Objective: To investigate species‐specific envenoming rates and spectrum of severity of funnel‐web spider bites, and the efficacy and adverse effects of funnel‐web spider antivenom. 
Osteo-cutaneous necrosis following a spider bite to the thumb
TLDR
Despite funnel web spiders, being amongst the most dangerous spiders in the world, not all bites from this species require antivenom, as there is variation in venom toxicity within the spider species within this family. Expand
First report of a funnel‐web spider envenoming syndrome in Brisbane
TLDR
Emergency departments in the greater Brisbane area should be prepared for this clinical scenario, and stocks of Commonwealth Serum Laboratory funnel‐web spider antivenom, until now thought to be unnecessary, should be readily available. Expand
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TLDR
Misdiagnosing a wound as a spider bite can lead to delays in appropriate care, cause adverse or even fatal outcomes and have medical-legal implications. Expand
Medical aspects of spider bites.
TLDR
Many spiders blamed for causing medical mischief have been elevated to medical significance via circumstantial evidence, poor reporting, and repetitive citation in the literature; several species have been shown to be harmless with more stringent scientific evidence involving verified bites in humans. Expand
Catecholamine‐induced cardiomyopathy resulting from life‐threatening funnel‐web spider envenoming
TLDR
Funnel-web spider envenoming appears to cause catecholamineinduced cardiomyopathy and cardiogenic pulmonary oedema resulting from catecholinamine excess, and a 13-year-old girl developedCardiogenic shock after a funnel- web spider bite. Expand
Spider bite
TLDR
Antivenoms are an important treatment for spider envenomation but have been less successful than have those for snake en venomation, with concerns about their effectiveness for both latrodectism and loxoscelism. Expand
Snake bite: a current approach to management
TLDR
Antivenoms are available for the five major groups of snakes and are the mainstay of therapy in patients with systemic envenoming and should be administered by slow intravenous infusion in a critical care area. Expand
How informative are case studies of spider bites in the medical literature?
  • M. Stuber, W. Nentwig
  • Medicine
  • Toxicon : official journal of the International Society on Toxinology
  • 2016
TLDR
It is found that only 22% of these studies fulfilled the criteria for a verified spider bite, which means that the majority of such case studies cannot be attributed to a given spider species and usually not even to a spider. Expand
Towards rationalisation of antivenom use in funnel-web spider envenoming: enzyme immunoassays for venom concentrations
TLDR
Detection of venom in suspected funnel-web spider bites identified definite cases with characteristic envenoming and a spider was identified, demonstrating that venom was bound by antivenom, but in severe cases cardiac toxicity was not reversed. Expand
Low Health System Performance, Indigenous Status and Antivenom Underdosage Correlate with Spider Envenoming Severity in the Remote Brazilian Amazon
TLDR
Spider bites can be painful and lead to local manifestations but rarely result in life-threatening envenoming, so envenomings occurring in remote rural areas, Indigenous status and living in a municipality located >300 km away from the state capital Manaus could be contributing factors to higher severity of spider envenmings in this area, as well as to antivenom underdosage. Expand
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References

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THE SYDNEY FUNNEL–WEB SPIDER (ATRAX ROBUSTUS): 3. A REVIEW OF SOME CLINICAL RECORDS OF HUMAN ENVENOMATION
The classical syndrome of envenomation is described and four recent cases, including one in an addendum, are reported. The cases indicate the unpredictability of the clinical course and outcome.Expand
Severe Lung Oedema and Fatal Consumption Coagulopathy after Funnel‐Web Bite
A young woman who was bitten by a male funnel‐web spider presented with early, severe pulmonary oedema which was successfully managed with positive end expiratory pressure ventilation. However, threeExpand
Funnel-web spider (Atrax robustus) antivenom. 2. Early clinical experience.
TLDR
The successful use of funnel-web antivenom in two severe cases of envenomation from bites by a male funnel- web spider, Atrax robustus, means that the duration of hospitalisation was dramatically reduced. Expand
Efficacy of funnel‐web spider antivenom in human envenomation by Hadronyche species (for editorial comment, see page 610; see also page 705)
TLDR
All three patients required further doses of antivenom to reverse the symptoms completely and none of the patients had received first aid. Expand
Funnel‐web spider (Hadronyche infensa) envenomations in coastal south‐east Queensland
TLDR
Clinicians and the community should be aware of the risks and immediate management of these bites in areas such as this, where funnel‐web spider bites are reported less frequently than in New South Wales. Expand
NEW FIRST‐AID MEASURES FOR ENVENOMATION; WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO BITES BY THE SYDNEY FUNNEL‐WEB SPIDER (ATRAX ROBUSTUS)
The advantages of the pressure/immobilization technique as the first‐aid measure for envenomation are discussed. The use of arterial tourniquets is no longer recommended in the management of any typeExpand
OBSERVATIONS ON THE VENOM OF THE SYDNEY FUNNEL‐WEB SPIDER (ATRAX ROBUSTUS)
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  • Medicine
  • The Medical journal of Australia
  • 1961
REPORTS OF CASESSpontaneous Perforation of the Colon In the Absence of any Pathological Condition, by William J. McCann . . . . . . . . . . 707 Illness Simulating Paralytic Poliomyelitis AssociatedExpand
Funnel‐web spider (Atrax robustus) antivenom in the treatment of human envenomation
TLDR
There have been no deaths since the antivenom has been used, and it is hoped that human fatalities as a result of funnel‐web spider envenomation will become a thing of the past. Expand
A prospective study of 750 definite spider bites, with expert spider identification.
TLDR
Australian spider bite caused minor effects in most cases and is unlikely to cause necrotic ulcers, allergic reactions or infection, and the circumstances and early clinical features of spider bites may allow early appropriate advice and treatment of spider bite without taxonomic identification. Expand
Antivenom use in Australia: Premedication, adverse reactions and the use of venom detection kits
To analyse reports of antivenom use and sequelae in Australia from 1 July 1989 to 30 June 1990. The value of snake venom detection kits (VDKs) was also analysed.
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