Functional morphology of the feeding apparatus, feeding constraints, and suction performance in the nurse shark Ginglymostoma cirratum

@article{Motta2008FunctionalMO,
  title={Functional morphology of the feeding apparatus, feeding constraints, and suction performance in the nurse shark Ginglymostoma cirratum},
  author={Philip Jay Motta and Robert E. Hueter and Timothy C. Tricas and Adam P. Summers and Daniel R. Huber and Dayv Lowry and Kyle R. Mara and Michael P. Matott and Lisa B. Whitenack and Alpa Patel Wintzer},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2008},
  volume={269}
}
The nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum, is an obligate suction feeder that preys on benthic invertebrates and fish. Its cranial morphology exhibits a suite of structural and functional modifications that facilitate this mode of prey capture. During suction‐feeding, subambient pressure is generated by the ventral expansion of the hyoid apparatus and the floor of its buccopharyngeal cavity. As in suction‐feeding bony fishes, the nurse shark exhibits expansive, compressive, and recovery kinematic… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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