Functional morphology of feeding in the scale-eating specialist Catoprion mento

@article{Janovetz2005FunctionalMO,
  title={Functional morphology of feeding in the scale-eating specialist Catoprion mento},
  author={Jeffrey. Janovetz},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={208},
  pages={4757 - 4768}
}
SUMMARY The wimple piranha, Catoprion mento, has a narrow-range natural diet with fish scales comprising an important proportion of its total food intake. Scales are eaten throughout most of ontogeny and adults feed almost exclusively on this food source. Catoprion exhibits a novel prey capture behavior when removing scales for ingestion. Scale feeding strikes involve a high-speed, open-mouth, ramming attack where the prey is bitten to remove scales and the force of the collision knocks scales… Expand

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