Functional magnetic resonance adaptation reveals the involvement of the dorsomedial stream in hand orientation for grasping.

@article{Monaco2011FunctionalMR,
  title={Functional magnetic resonance adaptation reveals the involvement of the dorsomedial stream in hand orientation for grasping.},
  author={Simona Monaco and Cristiana Cavina-Pratesi and Anna Sedda and Patrizia Fattori and Claudio Galletti and Jody C. Culham},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={2011},
  volume={106 5},
  pages={
          2248-63
        }
}
Reach-to-grasp actions require coordination of different segments of the upper limbs. Previous studies have examined the neural substrates of arm transport and hand grip components of such actions; however, a third component has been largely neglected: the orientation of the wrist and hand appropriately for the object. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation (fMRA) to investigate human brain areas involved in processing hand orientation during grasping movements… 

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