Functional imaging of face and hand imitation: towards a motor theory of empathy

@article{Leslie2004FunctionalIO,
  title={Functional imaging of face and hand imitation: towards a motor theory of empathy},
  author={Kenneth Leslie and Scott H. Johnson-Frey and Scott T. Grafton},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2004},
  volume={21},
  pages={601-607}
}

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