Functional flexibility of infant vocalization and the emergence of language

@article{Oller2013FunctionalFO,
  title={Functional flexibility of infant vocalization and the emergence of language},
  author={D. Oller and E. Buder and Heather L. Ramsdell and A. Warlaumont and L. Chorna and R. Bakeman},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2013},
  volume={110},
  pages={6318 - 6323}
}
We report on the emergence of functional flexibility in vocalizations of human infants. This vastly underappreciated capability becomes apparent when prelinguistic vocalizations express a full range of emotional content—positive, neutral, and negative. The data show that at least three types of infant vocalizations (squeals, vowel-like sounds, and growls) occur with this full range of expression by 3–4 mo of age. In contrast, infant cry and laughter, which are species-specific signals… Expand
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