Functional chest pain: nociception and visceral hyperalgesia.

@article{Chahal2005FunctionalCP,
  title={Functional chest pain: nociception and visceral hyperalgesia.},
  author={Premjit S Chahal and Satish S C Rao},
  journal={Journal of clinical gastroenterology},
  year={2005},
  volume={39 5 Suppl 3},
  pages={
          S204-9; discussion S210
        }
}
Functional chest pain is a common, yet poorly understood entity. The focus of this review is to explore the evolving research and clinical approaches with a particular emphasis on the sensory or afferent neuronal dysfunction of the esophagus as a key player in the manifestation of this pain syndrome. Although once regarded as a psychologic or esophageal motility disorder, recent advances have shown that many of these patients have visceral hyperalgesia. Whether visceral hypersensitivity is a… 
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