Functional characteristics of the midbrain periaqueductal gray

@article{Behbehani1995FunctionalCO,
  title={Functional characteristics of the midbrain periaqueductal gray},
  author={Michael M. Behbehani},
  journal={Progress in Neurobiology},
  year={1995},
  volume={46},
  pages={575-605}
}
  • M. Behbehani
  • Published 1 August 1995
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Progress in Neurobiology
The major functions of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG), including pain and analgesia, fear and anxiety, vocalization, lordosis and cardiovascular control are considered in this review article. The PAG is an important site in ascending pain transmission. It receives afferents from nociceptive neurons in the spinal cord and sends projections to thalamic nuclei that process nociception. The PAG is also a major component of a descending pain inhibitory system. Activation of this system… Expand
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Periaqueductal efferents to dopamine and GABA neurons of the VTA
TLDR
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TLDR
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