Functional balance between haemagglutinin and neuraminidase in influenza virus infections

@article{Wagner2002FunctionalBB,
  title={Functional balance between haemagglutinin and neuraminidase in influenza virus infections},
  author={Ralf Wagner and Mikhail Matrosovich and Hans Dieter Klenk},
  journal={Reviews in Medical Virology},
  year={2002},
  volume={12}
}
Influenza A and B viruses carry two surface glycoproteins, the haemagglutinin (HA) and the neuraminidase (NA). Both proteins have been found to recognise the same host cell molecule, sialic acid. HA binds to sialic acid‐containing receptors on target cells to initiate virus infection, whereas NA cleaves sialic acids from cellular receptors and extracellular inhibitors to facilitate progeny virus release and to promote the spread of the infection to neighbouring cells. Numerous studies performed… Expand
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