Functional and Evolutionary Insights from the Genomes of Three Parasitoid Nasonia Species

@article{Werren2010FunctionalAE,
  title={Functional and Evolutionary Insights from the Genomes of Three Parasitoid Nasonia Species},
  author={John H. Werren and Stephen Richards and Christopher A. Desjardins and Oliver Niehuis and J{\"u}rgen R. Gadau and John K. Colbourne and Leo W. Beukeboom and Claude Desplan and Christine G. Elsik and Cornelis J P Grimmelikhuijzen and Paul A. Kitts and Jeremy A. Lynch and Terence D. Murphy and Deodoro C. S. G. Oliveira and Christopher D. Smith and Louis van de Zande and Kim C. Worley and Evgeny M. Zdobnov and Maarten Aerts and {\vS}tefan Albert and V{\'i}ctor Hugo Anaya and Juan Manuel Anzola and Angel Roberto Barchuk and Susanta K. Behura and Agata N Bera and May R. Berenbaum and Rinaldo C. Bertossa and M{\'a}rcia M. G. Bitondi and Seth R. Bordenstein and Peer Bork and Erich Bornberg-Bauer and Marleen Brunain and Giuseppe Cazzamali and Lesley S. Chaboub and Joseph Chacko and Dean Chavez and Christopher P. Childers and Jeong-Hyeon Choi and Michael E. Clark and Charles Claudianos and Rochelle A Clinton and Andrew Cree and Alexandre S. Cristino and Phat M Dang and Alistair C. Darby and Dirk C. de Graaf and Bart Devreese and Huyen Dinh and Rachel Edwards and Navin Elango and Eran Elhaik and Olga D. Ermolaeva and Jay D. Evans and Sylvain For{\^e}t and Gerald R. Fowler and Daniel Gerlach and Joshua D. Gibson and Donald G. Gilbert and Dan Graur and Stefan Gr{\"u}nder and Darren Erich Hagen and Yi Han and Frank M. Hauser and Dan Hultmark and Henry Clay Hunter and Gregory D. D. Hurst and Shalini N. Jhangian and Huaiyang Jiang and Reed M. Johnson and Andrew K. Jones and Thomas Junier and Tatsuhiko Kadowaki and Albert Kamping and Yu. L. Kapustin and Bobak Kechavarzi and Jaebum Kim and Jay W. Kim and Boris Kiryutin and Tosca Koevoets and Christie L. Kovar and Evgenia V. Kriventseva and Robert Kucharski and Heewook Lee and Sandy Lee and Kristin Lees and Lora R. Lewis and David W. Loehlin and John M. Logsdon and Jacqueline Lopez and Ryan J. Lozado and Donna R. Maglott and Ryszard Maleszka and Anoop M. Mayampurath and Daniel J. Mazur and Marcella A. McClure and Andrew D. Moore and Margaret B. Morgan and J. Muller and Monica C. Munoz-Torres and Donna M. Muzny and Lynne V. Nazareth and Susanne Neupert and Ngoc Bich Nguyen and Francis Morais Franco Nunes and John G. Oakeshott and Geoffrey O. Okwuonu and Bart A. Pannebakker and Vikas Rao Pejaver and Zuogang Peng and Stephen C. Pratt and Reinhard Predel and Lingling Pu and Hilary Ranson and Rhitoban Raychoudhury and Andreas Rechtsteiner and Justin T. Reese and Jeffrey G. Reid and Megan C Riddle and Hugh M. Robertson and Jeanne Romero‐Severson and Miriam I Rosenberg and Timothy B Sackton and David B. Sattelle and Helge Schl{\"u}ns and Thomas Schmitt and Martina Schneider and Andreas Sch{\"u}ler and Andrew Michael Schurko and David M. Shuker and Zil{\'a} Luz Paulino Sim{\~o}es and Saurabh Sinha and Zachary Smith and Victor V. Solovyev and Alexandre Souvorov and Andreas Springauf and Elisabeth Stafflinger and Deborah E. Stage and Mario Stanke and Yoshiaki Tanaka and Arndt Telschow and Carol Trent and Selina Vattathil and Eveline C. Verhulst and Lumi Viljakainen and Kevin W. Wanner and Robert M. Waterhouse and James B. Whitfield and Timothy E Wilkes and Michael Williamson and Judith H. Willis and Florian Wolschin and Stefan Wyder and Takuji Yamada and Soojin V. Yi and Courtney N. Zecher and Lan Zhang and Richard A. Gibbs},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={327},
  pages={343 - 348}
}
Parasitoid Wasp Genomes Parasitoid wasps, which prey on and reproduce in host insect species, play important roles in plant herbivore interactions, and may provide valuable tools in the biological control of pest species. The Nasonia Genome Working Group (p. 343; see the news story by Pennisi) presents the genome of three very closely related species: Nasonia vitripennis, N. giraulti, and N. longicornis. The findings document rapid evolution between a host and endosymbiont that can cause… 

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It is shown that a major locus strongly influences host preference in Nasonia, the first introgressed of the host preference of one parasitoid species into another, as well as one of the few cases of introgression of a behavioral gene between species.

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