Functional Role of Tryptophan Residues in the Fourth Transmembrane Domainof the CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor

@article{Rhee2000FunctionalRO,
  title={Functional Role of Tryptophan Residues in the Fourth Transmembrane Domainof the CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor},
  author={Man Hee Rhee and Igal Nevo and Michael L. Bayewitch and Orna Zagoory and Zvi Vogel},
  journal={Journal of Neurochemistry},
  year={2000},
  volume={75}
}
Abstract: Several tryptophan (Trp) residues are conserved in Gprotein‐coupled receptors (GPCRs). Relatively little is known about thecontribution of these residues and especially of those in the fourthtransmembrane domain in the function of the CB2 cannabinoidreceptor. Replacing W158 (very highly conserved in GPCRs) and W172 (conservedin CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors but not in manyother GPCRs) of the human CB2 receptor with A or L or with F or Yproduced different results. We found that the… 
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