Functional MRI-based lie detection: scientific and societal challenges

@article{Farah2014FunctionalML,
  title={Functional MRI-based lie detection: scientific and societal challenges},
  author={Martha J. Farah and J. Benjamin Hutchinson and Elizabeth A. Phelps and Anthony D. Wagner},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2014},
  volume={15},
  pages={123-131}
}
Functional MRI (fMRI)-based lie detection has been marketed as a tool for enhancing personnel selection, strengthening national security and protecting personal reputations, and at least three US courts have been asked to admit the results of lie detection scans as evidence during trials. How well does fMRI-based lie detection perform, and how should the courts, and society more generally, respond? Here, we address various questions — some of which are based on a meta-analysis of published… 
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