Functional Anatomy of the Female Pelvic Floor

@article{AshtonMiller2007FunctionalAO,
  title={Functional Anatomy of the Female Pelvic Floor},
  author={James A. Ashton-Miller and John O. L. DeLancey},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={1101}
}
Abstract:  The anatomic structures in the female that prevent incontinence and genital organ prolapse on increases in abdominal pressure during daily activities include sphincteric and supportive systems. In the urethra, the action of the vesical neck and urethral sphincteric mechanisms maintains urethral closure pressure above bladder pressure. Decreases in the number of striated muscle fibers of the sphincter occur with age and parity. A supportive hammock under the urethra and vesical neck… 
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