Function of pectoral fins in rainbow trout: behavioral repertoire and hydrodynamic forces

@article{Drucker2003FunctionOP,
  title={Function of pectoral fins in rainbow trout: behavioral repertoire and hydrodynamic forces},
  author={Eliot G. Drucker and George V. Lauder},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2003},
  volume={206},
  pages={813 - 826}
}
SUMMARY Salmonid fishes (trout, salmon and relatives) have served as a model system for study of the mechanics of aquatic animal locomotion, yet little is known about the function of non-axial propulsors in this major taxonomic group. In this study we examine the behavioral and hydromechanical repertoire of the paired pectoral fins of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, performing both steady rectilinear swimming and unsteady maneuvering locomotion. A combination of kinematic analysis and… Expand
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  • E. Standen
  • Physics, Medicine
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  • 2008
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This paper is the first to use three-dimensional kinematic analysis of paired pelvic fins to formulate hypotheses of pelvic fin function, and challenges the understanding that pelvic fins have a limited and passive function by proposing three new hypotheses. Expand
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