Fully device-independent quantum key distribution.

@article{Vazirani2014FullyDQ,
  title={Fully device-independent quantum key distribution.},
  author={Umesh V. Vazirani and Thomas Vidick},
  journal={Physical Review Letters},
  year={2014},
  volume={113},
  pages={140501}
}
Quantum cryptography promises levels of security that are impossible to replicate in a classical world. Can this security be guaranteed even when the quantum devices on which the protocol relies are untrusted? This central question dates back to the early 1990s when the challenge of achieving device-independent quantum key distribution was first formulated. We answer this challenge by rigorously proving the device-independent security of a slight variant of Ekert's original entanglement-based… 
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qu an tph ] 2 6 M ar 2 01 9 Simple and tight device-independent security proofs
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