Fully Conservative Higher Order Finite Difference Schemes for Incompressible Flow

@article{Morinishi1998FullyCH,
  title={Fully Conservative Higher Order Finite Difference Schemes for Incompressible Flow},
  author={Youhei Morinishi and Thomas S. Lund and Oleg V. Vasilyev and Parviz Moin},
  journal={Journal of Computational Physics},
  year={1998},
  volume={143},
  pages={90-124}
}
Conservation properties of the mass, momentum, and kinetic energy equations for incompressible flow are specified as analytical requirements for a proper set of discrete equations. Existing finite difference schemes in regular and staggered grid systems are checked for violations of the conservation requirements and a few important discrepancies are pointed out. In particular, it is found that none of the existing higher order schemes for a staggered mesh system simultaneously conserve mass… 

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