Fuelling Cerebral Activity in Exercising Man

@article{Dalsgaard2006FuellingCA,
  title={Fuelling Cerebral Activity in Exercising Man},
  author={Mads K. Dalsgaard},
  journal={Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow \& Metabolism},
  year={2006},
  volume={26},
  pages={731 - 750}
}
  • M. Dalsgaard
  • Published 2006
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism
The metabolic response to brain activation in exercise might be expressed as the cerebral metabolic ratio (MR; uptake O2/glucose + 1/2 lactate). At rest, brain energy is provided by a balanced oxidation of glucose as MR is close to 6, but activation provokes a ‘surplus’ uptake of glucose relative to that of O2. Whereas MR remains stable during light exercise, it is reduced by 30% to 40% when exercise becomes demanding. The MR integrates metabolism in brain areas stimulated by sensory input from… Expand
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