Fruits, vegetables and lung cancer: A pooled analysis of cohort studies

@article{SmithWarner2003FruitsVA,
  title={Fruits, vegetables and lung cancer: A pooled analysis of cohort studies},
  author={Stephanie A Smith-Warner and Donna Spiegelman and S S Yaun and Demetrius Albanes and W Lawrence Beeson and Piet A. van den Brandt and D Feskanich and Aaron R. Folsom and Gary E. Fraser and Jo L. Freudenheim and Edward L. Giovannucci and R. Alexandra Goldbohm and Saxon Graham and Lawrence H. Kushi and Anthony B Miller and Pirjo Pietinen and Thomas E Rohan and Frank E. Speizer and Walter C. Willett and David J. Hunter},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2003},
  volume={107}
}
Inverse associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer risk have been consistently reported. However, identifying the specific fruits and vegetables associated with lung cancer is difficult because the food groups and foods evaluated have varied across studies. We analyzed fruit and vegetable groups using standardized exposure and covariate definitions in 8 prospective studies. We combined study‐specific relative risks (RRs) using a random effects model. In the pooled… Expand
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