Fruits, vegetables and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies

@article{Aune2012FruitsVA,
  title={Fruits, vegetables and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies},
  author={Dagfinn Aune and Doris S. M. Chan and Ana Rita Vieira and Deborah Navarro Rosenblatt and Rui Vieira and Darren Charles Greenwood and Teresa Norat},
  journal={Breast Cancer Research and Treatment},
  year={2012},
  volume={134},
  pages={479-493}
}
Evidence for an association between fruit and vegetable intake and breast cancer risk is inconclusive. [...] Key Method We searched PubMed for prospective studies of fruit and vegetable intake and breast cancer risk until April 30, 2011. We included fifteen prospective studies that reported relative risk estimates and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer associated with fruit and vegetable intake. Random effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks. The summary relative risk (RR) for…Expand
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TLDR
There is a weak but statistically significant nonlinear inverse association between fruit and vegetable intake and colorectal cancer risk and the greatest risk reduction was observed when intake increased from very low levels of intake. Expand
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