Fruit consumption and seed dispersal by birds in native vs. ex situ individuals of the endangered Chinese yew, Taxus chinensis

@article{Li2014FruitCA,
  title={Fruit consumption and seed dispersal by birds in native vs. ex situ individuals of the endangered Chinese yew, Taxus chinensis},
  author={N. Li and Shu-qing An and Z. Liu and C. Lu},
  journal={Ecological Research},
  year={2014},
  volume={29},
  pages={917-923}
}
  • N. Li, Shu-qing An, +1 author C. Lu
  • Published 2014
  • Biology
  • Ecological Research
  • The conservation success of endangered trees may depend on re-establishing or replacing the mutualisms that were important in their native habitats. In this study, we quantified avian frugivore diversity on individuals of the endangered Chinese yew (Taxus chinensis) in a botanical garden and at a natural site. We found that frugivore species diversity was lower in the botanical garden than in the natural site. In spite of the relatively low frugivore diversity, however, the ex-situ population… CONTINUE READING
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