Fruit bats (Pteropodidae) fuel their metabolism rapidly and directly with exogenous sugars

@article{Amitai2010FruitB,
  title={Fruit bats (Pteropodidae) fuel their metabolism rapidly and directly with exogenous sugars},
  author={O. Amitai and S. Holtze and S. Barkan and E. Amichai and C. Korine and B. Pinshow and C. Voigt},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2010},
  volume={213},
  pages={2693 - 2699}
}
SUMMARY Previous studies reported that fed bats and birds mostly use recently acquired exogenous nutrients as fuel for flight, rather than endogenous fuels, such as lipids or glycogen. However, this pattern of fuel use may be a simple size-related phenomenon because, to date, only small birds and bats have been studied with respect to the origin of metabolized fuel, and because small animals carry relatively small energy reserves, considering their high mass-specific metabolic rate. We… Expand
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