Fruit and seed biomineralization and its effect on preservation

@article{Messager2010FruitAS,
  title={Fruit and seed biomineralization and its effect on preservation},
  author={Erwan Messager and A{\"i}cha Badou and François Fr{\"o}hlich and Brigitte Deniaux and David Lordkipanidze and Pierre Voinchet},
  journal={Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences},
  year={2010},
  volume={2},
  pages={25-34}
}
Mineralised fruits and seeds are frequently found in archaeological sediments but their chemical nature has not been often examined. The nature and the origin of these archaeobotanical remains have to be investigated to understand their taphonomic history. Fruits or seeds can be mineralised not only by replacement mineralisation but also by biomineralisation during the plant life. The mineral components of three fossil fruits sampled on the Pleistocene site of Dmanisi were analysed and compared… 

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