Fruit Juice in Infants, Children, and Adolescents: Current Recommendations

@article{Heyman2017FruitJI,
  title={Fruit Juice in Infants, Children, and Adolescents: Current Recommendations},
  author={Melvin B. Heyman and Steven A. Abrams},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2017},
  volume={139}
}
Historically, fruit juice was recommended by pediatricians as a source of vitamin C and as an extra source of water for healthy infants and young children as their diets expanded to include solid foods with higher renal solute load. It was also sometimes recommended for children with constipation. Fruit juice is marketed as a healthy, natural source of vitamins and, in some instances, calcium. Because juice tastes good, children readily accept it. Although juice consumption has some benefits… 
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References

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TLDR
It is recommended that the US Department of Agriculture's Child and Adult Food Care Program, which manages the meal patterns in childcare centers such as Head Start, promote the elimination of fruit juice in favor of whole fruit for children.
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TLDR
Three cases are presented documenting the variability of symptoms including one adolescent who became symptomatic while on a fruit and juice diet and Elimination of the offending juices immediately stopped the diarrhea in all of the cases.
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TLDR
The study demonstrated less carbohydrate malabsorption following ingestion of white grape juice compared with apple juice in healthy 6- and 18-month-old children.
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TLDR
Consumption of > or = 12 fl oz/day of fruit juice by young children was associated with short stature and with obesity, and parents and care takers should limit young children's consumption of fruit Juice to less than 12 floz/day.
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TLDR
The consistent lack of relationship between children's fruit juice intake and growth parameters in this study does not support previous recommendations to limit the intake of 100% fruit juice to <12 ounces/day and results consistently indicated no statistically significant differences in children's height, body mass index, or ponderal index related to fruit Juice intake.
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TLDR
When either grape or pear juice is administered in a dosage of 10 mL/kg/day, the carbohydrate is well absorbed, produces no adverse gastrointestinal symptoms, and has no effect on stool water in healthy infants.
Excess fruit juice consumption as a contributing factor in nonorganic failure to thrive.
TLDR
Findings indicate that large intakes of fruit juices may displace more calorie- and nutrient-dense foods and that fructose and sorbitol malabsorption may occur.
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TLDR
The data show that the efficiency of carbohydrate absorption of one age-specific serving of juice increases with advancing age of children, and decreased carbohydrate absorption occurs more frequently with juices containing more fructose than glucose and/or sorbitol than with juices which contain equal amounts of fructose and glucose and are sorbitols free.
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TLDR
Elimination of apple juice from the diets of the nine patients resulted in normalisation of both the frequency and the consistency of the stools, and it was estimated that fructose accounted for 80% of the incomplete absorption and sorbitol for 20%.
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TLDR
Breath hydrogen analyses in healthy children and children with chronic nonspecific diarrhea after they had ingested pear, grape, and apple juices and a 2% sorbitol solution found excess breath H2 excretion in virtually all study subjects.
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