Fruit Fate, Seed Germination and Growth of an Invasive Vine – an Experimental Test of ‘sit and Wait’ Strategy

@article{Greenberg2004FruitFS,
  title={Fruit Fate, Seed Germination and Growth of an Invasive Vine – an Experimental Test of ‘sit and Wait’ Strategy},
  author={Cathryn H. Greenberg and Lindsay Maxwell Smith and Douglas J. Levey},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2004},
  volume={3},
  pages={363-372}
}
Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb.) is a non-indigenous, invasive woody vine in North America that proliferates in disturbed open sites. Unlike most invasive species, C. orbiculatus exhibits a ‘sit and wait’ strategy by establishing and persisting indefinitely in undisturbed, closed canopy forest and responding to canopy disturbance with rapid growth, often overtopping trees. We compared fruit fates of C. orbiculatus and native American holly (Ilex opaca). We also explored… Expand

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