Fruit, vegetables and prevention of cognitive decline or dementia: A systematic review of cohort studies

@article{Loef2012FruitVA,
  title={Fruit, vegetables and prevention of cognitive decline or dementia: A systematic review of cohort studies},
  author={Martin Loef and Harald Walach},
  journal={The journal of nutrition, health \& aging},
  year={2012},
  volume={16},
  pages={626-630}
}
  • M. Loef, H. Walach
  • Published 1 July 2012
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • The journal of nutrition, health & aging
BackgroundRegular consumption of fruit and vegetables has been considered to be associated with a reduced risk of dementia and age-associated cognitive decline, although the association is currently unsupported by a systematic review of the literature.MethodsWe searched Medline, Embase, Biosis, ALOIS, the Cochrane library, different publisher databases as well as bibliographies of retrieved articles. All cohort studies with a follow-up of 6 months or longer were included if they reported an… 
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  • Medicine, Psychology
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Plasma Carotenoids Are Inversely Associated With Dementia Risk in an Elderly French Cohort.
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This large cohort of older participants suggests that maintaining higher concentrations of lutein in respect to plasma lipids may moderately decrease the risk of dementia and AD.
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