Fruit, vegetables, and cancer prevention: a review of the epidemiological evidence.

@article{Block1992FruitVA,
  title={Fruit, vegetables, and cancer prevention: a review of the epidemiological evidence.},
  author={Gladys Block and Blossom H. Patterson and Amy F. Subar},
  journal={Nutrition and cancer},
  year={1992},
  volume={18 1},
  pages={
          1-29
        }
}
Approximately 200 studies that examined the relationship between fruit and vegetable intake and cancers of the lung, colon, breast, cervix, esophagus, oral cavity, stomach, bladder, pancreas, and ovary are reviewed. A statistically significant protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption was found in 128 of 156 dietary studies in which results were expressed in terms of relative risk. For most cancer sites, persons with low fruit and vegetable intake (at least the lower one-fourth of… Expand
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  • Medicine
  • British Journal of Cancer
  • 2011
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
A typical Western diet, which is high in meats and low in vegetables, may be positively associated with ovarian cancer incidence, however, the association between specific dietary factors and EOC risk remains unclear and merits further examination. Expand
Intake of fruits, vegetables and selected micronutrients in relation to the risk of breast cancer
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