Frugal cannibals: how consuming conspecific tissues can provide conditional benefits to wood frog tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus)

@article{Jefferson2014FrugalCH,
  title={Frugal cannibals: how consuming conspecific tissues can provide conditional benefits to wood frog tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus)},
  author={Dale M. Jefferson and Keith A. Hobson and Brandon S. Demuth and Maud C. O. Ferrari and Douglas P. Chivers},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2014},
  volume={101},
  pages={291-303}
}
Tadpoles show considerable behavioral plasticity. When population densities become high, tadpoles often become cannibalistic, likely in response to intense competition. Conspecific tissues are potentially an ideal diet by composition and should greatly improve growth and development. However, the potential release of alarm cues from the tissues of injured conspecifics may act to deter potential cannibals from feeding. We conducted multiple feeding experiments to test the relative effects that a… Expand
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