Frontoparietal connectivity in substance-naïve youth with and without a family history of alcoholism.

Abstract

Frontoparietal connections underlie key executive cognitive functions. Abnormalities in the frontoparietal network have been observed in chronic alcoholics and associated with alcohol-related cognitive deficits. It remains unclear whether neurobiological differences in frontoparietal circuitry exist in substance-naïve youth who are at-risk for alcohol use disorders. This study used functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine frontoparietal connectivity and underlying white matter microstructure in 20 substance-naïve youth with a family history of alcohol dependence and 20 well-matched controls without familial substance use disorders. Youth with a family history of alcohol dependence showed significantly less functional connectivity between posterior parietal and dorsolateral prefrontal seed regions (ps<.05), as compared to family history negative controls; however, they did not show differences in white matter architecture within tracts subserving frontoparietal circuitry (ps>.34). Substance-naïve youth with a family history of alcohol dependence show less frontoparietal functional connectivity in the absence of white matter microstructural abnormalities as compared to youth with no familial risk. This may suggest a potential neurobiological marker for the development of substance use disorders.

DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2011.11.013

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@article{Wetherill2012FrontoparietalCI, title={Frontoparietal connectivity in substance-na{\"{i}ve youth with and without a family history of alcoholism.}, author={Reagan R. Wetherill and Sunita Bava and Wesley K. Thompson and Veronique Boucquey and Carmen Pulido and Tony T. Yang and Susan F. Tapert}, journal={Brain research}, year={2012}, volume={1432}, pages={66-73} }