Frontal and parietal cortical ensembles predict single‐trial muscle activity during reaching movements in primates

@article{Santucci2005FrontalAP,
  title={Frontal and parietal cortical ensembles predict single‐trial muscle activity during reaching movements in primates},
  author={David M. Santucci and J. Kralik and M. Lebedev and M. Nicolelis},
  journal={European Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2005},
  volume={22}
}
Previously we have shown that the kinematic parameters of reaching movements can be extracted from the activity of cortical ensembles. Here we used cortical ensemble activity to predict electromyographic (EMG) signals of four arm muscles in New World monkeys. The overall shape of the EMG envelope was predicted, as well as trial‐to‐trial variations in the amplitude and timing of bursts of muscle activity. Predictions of EMG patterns exhibited during reaching movements could be obtained not only… Expand

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