From writing to reading the encyclopedia of life

@article{Hebert2016FromWT,
  title={From writing to reading the encyclopedia of life},
  author={Paul D. N. Hebert and Peter M. Hollingsworth and Mehrdad Hajibabaei},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2016},
  volume={371}
}
Prologue ‘As the study of natural science advances, the language of scientific description may be greatly simplified and abridged. This has already been done by Linneaus and may be carried still further by other invention. The descriptions of natural orders and genera may be reduced to short definitions, and employment of signs, somewhat in the manner of algebra, instead of long descriptions. It is more easy to conceive this, than it is to conceive with what facility, and in how short a time, a… 

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