From the Shell-shocked Soldier to the Nervous Child: Psychoanalysis in the Aftermath of the First World War

@article{Roper2016FromTS,
  title={From the Shell-shocked Soldier to the Nervous Child: Psychoanalysis in the Aftermath of the First World War},
  author={M. Roper},
  journal={Psychoanalysis and History},
  year={2016},
  volume={18},
  pages={39-69}
}
  • M. Roper
  • Published 2016
  • History
  • Psychoanalysis and History
  • This article investigates the development of child analysis in Britain between the wars, as the anxious child succeeded the shell-shocked soldier as a focus of psychoanalytic enquiry. Historians of psychoanalysis tend to regard the Second World War as a key moment in the discovery of the ‘war within’ the child, but it was in the aftermath of the First War that the warring psyche of the child was observed and elaborated. The personal experience of war and its aftermath, and the attention given… CONTINUE READING
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