From the 'Great Convergence' to the 'First Great Divergence': Roman and Qin-Han State Formation and its Aftermath

@inproceedings{Scheidel2007FromT,
  title={From the 'Great Convergence' to the 'First Great Divergence': Roman and Qin-Han State Formation and its Aftermath},
  author={Walter Scheidel},
  year={2007}
}
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