From neurons to epidemics: How trophic coherence affects spreading processes.

@article{Klaise2016FromNT,
  title={From neurons to epidemics: How trophic coherence affects spreading processes.},
  author={Janis Klaise and Samuel Johnson},
  journal={Chaos},
  year={2016},
  volume={26 6},
  pages={
          065310
        }
}
Trophic coherence, a measure of the extent to which the nodes of a directed network are organised in levels, has recently been shown to be closely related to many structural and dynamical aspects of complex systems, including graph eigenspectra, the prevalence or absence of feedback cycles, and linear stability. Furthermore, non-trivial trophic structures have been observed in networks of neurons, species, genes, metabolites, cellular signalling, concatenated words, P2P users, and world trade… 

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